EmmaRose Crafts Blog

Hi,

We wanted to create a blog that would become a handy reference tool and for this reason you will find most of our posts relate to craft techniques and skills, with a few added extras here and there. We hope you find it useful and that you will visit often.

Happy crafting!

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  1. Needles used for cross stitch

     

    To avoid damage to the fabric the needles used for cross stitch are usually tapestry needles as they are quite blunt. The size of needle is dependent on the fabric type and the fabric count as using too large a needle will result in the holes of the fabric becoming stretched and distorted.

    The following chart shows the needle sizes most commonly used

     

    Tapestry Needle Size       Aida                 Evenweave

    18                                     6 – count

    20                                     8 – count

    22                                    11 – count         22, 25 & 27 – count

    24                                    14 – count         28 – count

    26                                    16 – count         32 – count

    28                                    18 – count         36 & 55 – count

  2. KNITTING NEEDLES

    History

    The earliest items discovered that resemble knitting are socks, found in Egyptian tombs dating back to around 3AD. However this might have been considered more as knotting (using a single needle) rather than knitting.  In fact the word ‘knit', which entered the English language in the 1400s, can be traced to the Old English word ‘cnyttan', which meant ‘knot'.

    As with many things, the true origins are lost in time and the process of crafting an item using sticks with some form of yarn may well date back well beyond the time historical records would suggest. That said it can be proven that knitting in a form recognisable to us today was certainly practised in 11th century Egypt, using silk and cotton. The 14th to 16th centuries saw knitting spread throughout Europe but it wasn’t until ordinary working class people began to knit that wool became the most commonly used yarn.

    It is likely that the first knitting needles would have been made of wood, although simple metal wires are also considered to be amongst the earliest. The two needle, bobble –ended versions that many of us are using today came about during the 19th Century (the Victorian era), as did the more orderly method of sizing the needles.

    Now knitting needles are available in many sizes and in various lengths. Some are straight ‘two pins’, some are circular, and yet others come in sets of four or five double-pointed. And they can be made from a variety of materials, such as metal, wood, bamboo, plastic, resin, etc

    Sizes

    KNITTING NEEDLE SIZES

    Metric (mm)

    UK (Old)

    US

                 

    Metric (mm)

    UK (Old)

    US

    2

    14

    0

     

    5.5

    5

    9

    2.25

    13

    1

     

    5.75

    -

    -

    2.75

    12

    2

     

    6

    4

    10

    3

    11

    -

     

    6.5

    3

    10

    3.25

    10

    3

     

    7

    2

    -

    3.5

    -

    4

     

    7.5

    1

    -

    3.75

    9

    5

     

    8

    0

    11

    4

    8

    6

     

    9

    00

    13

    4.25

    -

     -

     

    10

    000

    15

    4.5

    7

    7

     

    12

    -

    17

    5

    6

    8

     

    15

    -

    19

    5.25

    -

    -

     

    19

    -

    35

    There are a number of cases where there is not a comparable size between the different sizing options. Where this situation occurs the nearest needle size can be used, subject to the usual proviso of working a tension square to ensure its suitability.